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How to Resign as Agent for Service of Process (or Disclaim a Corporate Position)

California Secretary of State Form RA-100 - Resignation of Agent

In “Incorporation: Not All (States’) Agents are Created Equal“, I discussed how agents for service of process in California are less formal – in both their appointment and their responsibilities – than registered agents in other states. California agents can resign more easily, too.

Corporations Code Section 1503(a) states that an agent for service of process may resign simply by filing a signed and acknowledged written statement. The Secretary of State? has provided Form RA-100 for this purpose. (more…)

Incorporation: Not All (States’) Agents are Created Equal

"Agent for Service of Process" field from Statement of Information form

In a post last week (FreeRegisteredAgent.com Inaugurates Hall of Shame), I wrote that corporations (and other entities) formed in California do not require registered agents. After replying to a comment on that post and a separate e-mail from another reader, I realize that I should be more explicit about how an agent for service of process (in California) differs from a registered agent (in Delaware and many other states).

Here is the difference:

  • A registered agent typically is picked from a list maintained by the state and is paid for its services. (In Delaware, especially, registered agents are a major industry.) Furthermore, there generally is a requirement that the registered agent be available at its office sufficiently frequently to receive service of process, and it must forward to the corporation notice of its obligation to file an annual franchise tax report. (See, e.g., Delaware General Corporation Law Section 132.)
  • An agent for service of process can be any individual or any corporation (other than the one being formed, and subject to Corporations Code Section 1505) in California and need not necessarily be paid. So, for example, an individual forming a corporation in California can designate himself, or (presumably, with permission) his brother-in-law or his lawyer, as the corporation’s agent for service of process. Furthermore, the Corporations Code does not subject the agent obligations such as availability to receive service. California agents can resign more easily, too – see “How to Resign as Agent for Service of Process“.

Dana H. Shultz, Attorney at Law  +1 510-547-0545  dana [at] danashultz [dot] com
This blog does not provide legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. If you need legal advice, please contact a lawyer directly.

FreeRegisteredAgent.com Inaugurates Hall of Shame

Logo for FreeRegisteredAgent.com

I’ve run across another online incorporation / LLC formation service – FreeRegisteredAgent.com – with deficiencies that I must bring to readers’ attention. There now are enough of these companies that I have listed them on my new Hall of Shame page.

FreeRegisteredAgent.com’s claim to fame is that it provides registered-agent services at no charge for one year, and for $99 per year thereafter.

Their Free California Registered Agent Service page touts their service for California corporations, LLCs and other entities. The problem I have is that California does not require any entity to have a registered agent, so after the first year, companies are paying for a service that they don’t need!

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