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© 2009-2017 Dana H. Shultz, Attorney at Law

Employment Law for Foreigners

Logo for Quora, where Dana Shultz answered a question about U.S. employment law for foreignersThis post is about employment law. It is directed particularly to people from other countries who are not familiar with U.S. employment practices.

It is based on my answer to a Quora question.  Please see What are the most important aspects of American labor law that a foreigner trying to make a terrestrial logistics company in (any state of) the U.S. should take into consideration?

I am providing this answer based on my experience helping dozens of international clients conduct businesses in the U.S.

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How Much Does It Cost to Obtain an EIN?

Internal Revenue Service logo, symbolizing the cost to obtain an EINThis post about the cost to obtain an EIN (Employer Identification Number) in the United States is an Advertisement under Rule of Professional Conduct 1-400, Standard 5.

Recently I have received many inquiries from foreign owners of new companies in the U.S. They want to know how much it will cost to obtain an EIN from the Internal Revenue Service. This post provides that information. (more…)

Kickstarter Limits Foreign Entrepreneurs

Kickstarter logoKickstarter is a funding platform for creative projects. Recently, I have seen a surge of interest among foreign companies wishing to set up Kickstarter projects in the US. This post discusses the challenges those companies will face.

Kickstarter Creator Requirements

Kickstarter states the following concerning Who can use Kickstarter (updated November 24, 2017): (more…)

You *Don’t* Need an ITIN to Bring Your Company to the US

Logo of the Internal Revenue Service, which issues the ITINI recently have received several inquiries about whether a foreign company or its owners need an ITIN (Individual Taxpayer Identification Number) when they bring their business to the US. The answer is, “No.” The rest of this post explains why that is the case.

When a company wants to do business in the US, it needs an EIN (Employer Identification Number).

For a foreign or foreign-owned company, obtaining an EIN can be intimidating. This is especially true if the principal officer lacks a US social security number. (The EIN cannot be obtained quickly and easily online.)

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Pitch Coaches Teach How to Sell in the US

Logo of WSJ.com, which ran an article about pitch coachesIn a recent article (Foreign Entrepreneurs Learn Art of the American Pitch), the Wall Street Journal discussed the role of “pitch coaches” who help foreign entrepreneurs promote themselves in the US. While the article focused primarily on pitches to investors, it applies to selling one’s business to clients and colleagues, as well.

The thrust of the article is that selling in the US is different from selling in other countries. In my work with international clients, I have seen the same thing.

Here are some of the ways that pitch coaches say pitches need to be tailored to work best in the US.

What is an Inc. and Why Should I Want One?

Logo for Inc

Frequently, an international prospect or client will tell me that he wants to create an Inc. to run his business in the in the United States. This post explains what an “Inc.” is and where the term comes from.

History and Other Countries

For centuries, in the interest of fostering economic activity, governments have recognized certain types of businesses as separate legal entities. Investors’ liability is limited to the amount invested (“limited personal liability”). Investors’ other assets, beyond the amount invested, may not be taken to satisfy the business’s debts or other obligations.

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The Definition of Director May Depend on the Context

California Secretary of State logo

While working with one of my international clients several months ago, I re-learned a lesson that I already knew: The meaning of a word (in this case, the definition of Director) may depend on the context.

The client is located in Vietnam and wanted to open a branch office in the Bay Area. It would be “doing business” in California, so it needed to qualify as a foreign corporation.

I duly prepared a Statement and Designation by Foreign Corporation and had it signed by the client’s most senior officer. That officer’s title, translated as “Director,” was entered onto the form.

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Which is Best – “Inc.”, “Corp.” or Something Else?

Logo for Quora, the source for a question about Inc. and Corp.

This post is based on and expands upon an answer I provided on Quora. Q. Which company suffix to choose: “Inc.”, “Corp.”, etc? What are the criteria?

Many states – notably including Delaware (General Corporation Law Section 102(a)(1)) but, under most circumstances, excluding California – require that the name of a corporation include a word or abbreviation designating corporate status. Those that are used commonly include Corporation (Corp.), Incorporated (Inc.) and Limited (Ltd.).

The choice is totally a matter of style. This is more a marketing issue than a legal issue.

In my experience, “Inc.” is most popular – typically without a preceding comma, nowadays, for a cleaner look. Indeed, most of my foreign clients say “an Inc.” when they mean “a corporation”!

Related post: What is an Inc. and Why Should I Want One?

Dana H. Shultz, Attorney at Law  +1 510 547-0545  dana [at] danashultz [dot] com
This blog does not provide legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. If you need legal advice, please contact a lawyer directly.

Help – I Lost My SSN!

Seal of the Social Security Administration, which gives out each social security number ( SSN )

One of my foreign clients received a social security number as a child when he and his parents lived in the US for a year. Unfortunately, he could not find his SSN – which would help him obtain an Employer Identification Number for the corporation I was forming. (See Foreign Company Alert: Obtaining an EIN may be your Biggest Challenge in the U.S.)

He asked whether I could help him retrieve his SSN. Here is what I found.

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