The High-touch Legal Services® Blog…for Startups!

© 2009-2018 Dana H. Shultz, Attorney at Law

Who Can Sign Contracts for a Corporation?

Photo of hand with pen on paper, symbolizing who can sign contracts for a corporationA couple of weeks ago, I answered a question on Avvo about who can sign contracts on behalf of a corporation. This issue comes up from time to time, so I will discuss it at some length in this post.

Authorization to sign contracts is addressed in the corporation’s bylaws and / or in resolutions of the board of directors. (more…)

Cumulative Voting: Board Representation for Minority Shareholders

Photo of a ballot, symbolizing cumulative votingCumulative voting for corporate directors is a process by which each shareholder’s voting power is multiplied by the number of directors to be elected. The objective: By allocating all of their votes to one or a small number of directors, minority shareholders can ensure that their interests are represented on the board. (I.e., a majority shareholder will not automatically control all board seats.) (more…)

So how important is this legal stuff, anyway?

Two recently-acquired clients had similar situations that brought up the importance of complying with legal requirements.

Each company is a multi-founder startup where one founder became non-productive, and even somewhat detrimental to the business. The other founders wanted to move the problem founder off to the side, where he could cause no more trouble, in a manner that would be fair to everyone involved.

Unfortunately, each company had failed to comply with some of the most basic legal requirements: Holding annual shareholder meetings to elect directors, annual board of director meetings to appoint officers, etc. As a result, in each instance we had to spend time and money taking corporate actions, and recording those actions appropriately in meeting minutes, before the real problem could be solved.

(more…)

Annual Meetings: The Basics

Sometimes, in an effort to reduce legal fees, clients conduct corporate annual meetings, and prepare minutes, on their own. Regrettably, if they do not know what they are doing, they can make a mess. Here is a quick overview of how to do things right.

Both California (Corporations Code Section 600(b)) and Delaware (General Corporation Law Section 211(b)) require that every corporation hold an annual meeting of its shareholders to elect directors for the coming year. (In the case of a Delaware corporation, however, the directors may be elected by written consent without calling a meeting.) Any other proper business may be transacted at the shareholder meeting.

(more…)