Archive for Intellectual Property

Plagiarism and Copyright Infringement – Two Sides of the Same Coin

Logo for Quora, where Dana Shultz answered a question about plagiarismThis post compares plagiarism and copyright infringement. It is prompted by a Quora question that I answered several months ago. (See Have your ideas or works ever been plagiarized? What happened?)

Plagiarism Defined

Plagiarism is the wrongful appropriate on another’s work and presenting it as one’s own. One typically thinks of plagiarism occurring in academia or journalism. However, as discussed below, it can occur in other professions, too.

Copyright Infringement Defined

The holder of the copyright in a work has certain exclusive rights with respect to that work. These include (as applicable) the rights to reproduce, distribute, publicly perform, publicly display, and make derivative works of the work. Copyright infringement is use of a work, without permission of the copyright holder, that infringes on one of those exclusive rights.

Read more

Patent Licensee: Have a Track Record if You Want to Succeed

Logo for Quora where Dana Shultz answered a question from a prospective patent licenseeThis post is adapted from my answer to a Quora question from a prospective patent licensee. Q. How do I propose a licensing agreement with a patent holder?

A. In my experience, the most important thing that a prospective patent licensee needs to bring to the table is a successful track record.

Read more

Which Open Source License Should We Choose?

Logo for the Open Source Initiative, which can help developers choose which open source license to useSoftware developers may have decided to provide open source software, but they may not know which open source license to use. This post describes three resources developers can consult to help make that decision.

First, Open Source Initiative maintains a comprehensive list of open source software licenses. Licenses are grouped into categories, starting with the most popular licenses. However, the OSI site does not provide any tools to help decide which open source license to use.

Read more

Is a Copyright Notice with Multiple Years Legitimate?

Circle-C symbol representing a copyright notice with multiple yearsWe all have seen a typical copyright notice (e.g., “Copyright 2013 Anyhow, Inc.”) countless times. However, every once in a while, someone will see a copyright notice with multiple years (e.g., “2010-2013″) and will wonder whether it is legitimate.

As is explained in Copyright Protection in One Easy Lesson, 17 USC Section 401 states that a copyright notice must contain three elements.

  1. The symbol © (the letter C in a circle), the word “Copyright”, or the abbreviation “Copr.”
  2. The year of first publication.
  3. The name of the copyright owner.

Read more

The First Sale Doctrine: If I Own It, I Can Sell It

Green traffic light - symbol of first sale doctrine providing go-ahead, defense against IP infringement claim

Copyright and trademark owners typically like to exercise their legal rights as broadly as possible. There is however, a well-known limit to those rights called the “first sale doctrine“.

Actually, they are two separate but similar doctrines. One pertains to copyrights, the other to trademarks:

  • Copyrights17 USC Section 109(a) states, with certain exceptions, that the owner of a lawfully-made copy of a work may sell or dispose of the work. Consent of the copyright owner is not required. So, for example, if you legitimately possess a book or a CD, you may sell it or give it to someone else or throw it into a trash bin.
  • Trademarks – The trademark first sale doctrine is a product of case law rather than statute. In Sebastian International, Inc. v. Longs Drug Stores Corporation, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit wrote: “[W]ith certain well-defined exceptions, the right of a producer to control distribution of its trademarked product does not extend beyond the first sale of the product. Resale by the first purchaser of the original article under the producer’s trademark is neither trademark infringement nor unfair competition.” The exceptions include, for example, stolen or counterfeit goods or goods that have avoided the producer’s quality control systems.

Read more

Chubby Checker Files Ridiculous Trademark Infringement Suit

Photo of Chubby Checker

Chubby Checker (real name Ernest Evans) – the singer famous for The Twist dance craze in the 1960s – and certain corporations that he controls have filed a lawsuit against Hewlett-Packard Company and Palm, Inc. The suit concerns a no-longer-available app named “The Chubby Checker”.

The app purported to allow women to calculate the size of a man’s penis based on his shoe size. According to webOS Nation, the app was downloaded only 84 times before it was removed in September 2012. Yet press reports state that the plaintiffs are seeking damages of $500 million for trademark infringement and unfair competition!

Read more

How Can I Make Sure I Receive My Full Royalty?

Curled paper tape from a calculator

Intellectual property license agreements often include a provision by which the licensor is paid a royalty that is calculated as a percentage of the revenue received by the licensee from licensed products. Given that licensees have a financial incentive to reduce the amount of revenue that is reported*, the prudent licensor includes an audit provision in the license agreement.

The audit provision typically:

  • Specifies the frequency and nature of audits that may be conducted;
  • Provides that the licensee will pay any underpayment amount that is discovered plus interest; and
  • Obligates the licensor to pay for the audit unless the underpayment exceeds X% of the royalty that was due, in which case the licensee must reimburse the licensor for the cost of the audit.

Read more

Who Owns My Text Messages?

Quora logo

This post is adapted from the answer that I provided to a Quora question, “Who owns our text messages?”

To start, I wondered what it means to “own” a text message. Black’s Law Dictionary provides such definitions as “have good legal title”, “hold as property” and “possess”. I don’t think the questioner had these in mind, so I think it is correct to focus on ownership of any copyright that may subsist in text messages.

Read more

I’m One of Several Inventors – Who Owns the Patent?

A recently-acquired client is one of three inventors of a device that received a U.S. patent. She asked me whether she can freely license to an LLC owned by two of the inventors the right to manufacture products covered by the license. I replied “yes” – here’s why.

35 U.S.C. Section 262 says:

In the absence of any agreement to the contrary, each of the joint owners of a patent may make, use, offer to sell, or sell the patented invention within the United States, or import the patented invention into the United States, without the consent of and without accounting to the other owners.

Read more

Corporate Officer Can Be Personally Liable for Copyright Infringement

Blue Nile logo

In Blue Nile v. Ideal Diamond Solutions, the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington held that co-defendant Larry Chasin, founder and an officer of defendant IDS, was personally liable for infringement of plaintiff Blue Nile’s copyrighted images, even though Chasin claimed he had no role in putting infringing images on websites and he did not know the images were infringing.

Blue Nile is an online jewelry and diamond retailer. Chasin founded and operated IDS to create websites for brick-and-mortar jewelers to help them compete online. The websites included some of Blue Nile’s copyrighted? images.

Read more